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Poster: light into ashes Date: Jul 13, 2013 8:21pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: new Festival Express footage & some dating notes

A few years ago, Lemieux played a few tracks from the Festival Express tour on the Taper's Section, dated like this:
7-1-70 China>Rider - 3/10/08
7-1-70 Lovelight - 6/30/08
7-1-70 Candyman, Dire Wolf, Uncle John's Band, Me and My Uncle, China>Rider - 6/29/09
7-3-70 China>Rider, Lovelight - 7/2/07
7-3-70 New Speedway Boogie - 9/29/08

It escaped my notice before, but someone's pointed out to me that not only are the Lovelights from 7/1 & 7/3/70 the same track, the China>Riders are also the same.
Lemieux even commented in the 6/30/08 Taper's Section that he'd played the Lovelight before, while dating it 7/1/70 (though it had been dated 7/3/70 before).

On 6/29/09 he played a longer chunk of this show, including Candyman, Dire Wolf & UJB from the acoustic set; then it's announced, "now the New Riders;" then we cut to the electric set, with MAMU & the same China>Rider - this show is dated 7/1/70.

Lemieux also played New Speedway in the 9/29/08 Taper's Section, dated 7/3/70. (It sounds different from the other tapes, being in stereo.)
The catch is, I think this is the same one that's in the Festival Express film, which is from Toronto 6/27/70!

As more evidence, there is part of a Lovelight from the Festival Express tour recently uploaded on youtube:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aJhnOq2q3ag
As you can hear, it's the same one that's on the Taper's Section. It's also from the same show as Don't Ease, New Speedway & Hard to Handle in the Festival Express video - Toronto 6/27/70.

Historic Films Archive also provided another brief excerpt from the end of this Lovelight, from a different camera:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXUbDTPBpKI

I think it's pretty cool to watch, even though it's just 10 minutes of snippets, and the camera angles are mostly not too great. We get some closeups of the drummers - check out Garcia after 7:30, as the band hits a peak.

There is also some silent footage of the NRPS set from this show, featuring Garcia up-front on pedal steel:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gUQW3jkHzMI

There's also a remarkable scene with Garcia, Weir & another guy arguing vehemently with one of the kids who wanted the Festival Express shows to be free:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SpocOtyjF2A

Anyway, for some reason, Lemieux has played us tracks from the Toronto show dated both 7/1 and 7/3.
Evidently there's some date mixup on these tapes in the Vault! I believe ALL the tracks Lemieux has played from this tour are actually from the 6/27/70 show. Possibly it's the only Festival Express show in the Vault.

There's also a snippet from this tour on the Archive, dated July 1 '70:
http://archive.org/details/gd70-07-01.sbd.cotsman.9624.sbeok.shnf
It includes Candyman, which is a different electric version.
I believe this is accurately dated; it has the same Easy Wind that's on video, also dated 7/1/70.

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Poster: Reade Date: Jul 14, 2013 3:51pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express footage & some dating notes

The bulk of the scene with Garcia arguing vehemently etc. is in the movie. Interestingly, what seems to have been left out of the movie are those sections where the camera pans to reveal the faces and voices of those he and Weir are debating.
I always wondered after seeing the film why we couldn't see 'the other side' of the discussion; why it was edited in that manner. Must have been for legal reasons of some sort.

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Jul 15, 2013 2:07am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express footage & some dating notes

Actually, the movie does show Weir's comments and the girl they're talking to. It leaves out Garcia's little speech though.

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Poster: Reade Date: Jul 16, 2013 9:25am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express footage & some dating notes

His speech about rock stars and 'bread' and how it all works? That's definitely in the movie.
What a time capsule moment. If anybody ever wanted to know about what's different between then and now would benefit greatly by listening to this exchange. Musicians being taken to task for charging for their shows seems so wildly absurd now, at least to me. Some hippie chick who's probably getting through college on student loans or via her parents taking Jerry freaking Garcia to task for not playing for free all the time is just so rich.

By the same token, the musicians end of this exchange seems badly flawed to me as well. First they make the mistake of being defensive about money. Shit, whether it's 1970 or not it seems it's gotta be painfully obvious that traveling musicians generally have all kinds of overhead to pay (hotels on the road are not free), in addition to having a right to make a living. And anybody who doesn't get that might not be worth the time it takes to have a conversation with. (Where was this hippie chick by the way when Garcia was living in his car and eating stolen pineapple from cans to survive? Her insights then as to how this is all supposed to work might have really helped him out).
Secondly, I gotta question Garcia's premise for what actually happens to the money once it's earned by musicians. That there's a whole lotta people living 'on the street' as a result of the good graces of professional musicians sounds ludicous. There were lot's of poor hippies surviving because of the success of bands like the Dead and CSN&Y, etc? That's all questionable if not absurd.
Garcia loved the notion of hippie economics, that the money that was made 'moved around really fast' as a result of everybody supporting each others' scene, with nobody hoarding or socking away much of it, or any. But the extent to which that was ever really a reality is something again that I question to a great extent.

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Jul 16, 2013 12:46pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express footage & some dating notes

Hmm, I didn't recall Jerry's speech in the movie; must've overlooked it.
But he did go on at other times about hippie economics & how the money goes around...he goes into more detail in the '71 Rolling Stone interview. I think his reference point was the SF scene in '66, where that might have worked, partly because SOME people were actually making money & living communally & the scene wasn't yet supporting all the street kids that came the next year. Probably not a viable demonstration of a permanent economy, though...

It does take some gall to stand in front of a band & insist they must play for free. Idealistic times! (We do it differently now; instead of thousands of protesting gate-crashers, everyone just quietly downloads music for free....)

In the scene we see, everyone's worked-up & not being too reasonable. I can understand some defensiveness on the Dead's part since they must have been constantly harangued by people asking for more free shows. Garcia patiently explained in a couple interviews why this is unfair to the musicians...but it must have appealed to the band's idealism as well. They were still playing free shows as late as '72.

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Poster: Reade Date: Jul 16, 2013 1:16pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express footage & some dating notes

Yeah in the '71 Rolling Stone interview he takes it a step farther and suggests a bonafide, seperate hippie economy wherein all straight dollars are converted to hippie dollars, at a rate of like 1000 to 1. That way if the only business you ever did was with other hippies, you'd have alot more dough than you would ever otherwise. Trouble is hippies never ended up owning electric companies, manufacturing their own automobiles, etc. It seems a viable concept if you can go all the way- but when you're still tied to the man for lotsa things........ it's much harder if not impossible to pull off I'd suggest.

The thing about 'music should be free' was such a huge thing in the culture at this exact time. I remember researching the date of the Dead's show in Phoenix in March of 1970 (initial editions of Deadbase had it wrong) and I ran across newspaper articles of how police were called to the theatre that night because of hundreds of people outside who wanted in- outraged that they were expected to pay for tickets.
How could peoples' heads have been so far up their rears on this issue at this time? Was the Dead's Phoenix hotel free that night? Did they not need to pay for their meals that day, or the day after? Was it against some laws of hippiedom that musicians couldn't make a living along with everybody else? How could people be so idiotic in their thoughts and actions on this issue?
A great example of 60s idealism jumping the track.....

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Jul 16, 2013 6:45pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express footage & some dating notes

I'd like to see those articles!
New York shows at the time were generally swarmed with crashers; by the fall '70 tour the Dead could hardly play a place without hundreds of kids trying to break in (and sometimes succeeding).
Of course in the case of this Phoenix 3/8/70 show, they might've been better advised to stay outside & be spared that mystery guest who decided to "sing" with the Dead....

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Poster: Reade Date: Jul 17, 2013 8:24am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express footage & some dating notes

As good as some of the March 1970 performances are it's a shame this one wasn't better- mystery singing guest or no. The stage was round and rotated slowly during performance and perhaps the band was not wild about that feature.
A small article it was- buried on a back page of the front news section. It was all about the disturbance and the police being called, nothing about the concert itself. The bands name was never even mentioned.

It all started when I went looking for reviews of what was listed at the time as their 3/7/70 Phx show, only to discover that on the Sat. night in question the venue had John Davidson and the comedian Norm Crosby booked.(Now *there* is an evenings worth of entertainment for you!)

Never did find any promotion or reviews for the actual 3/8 show, only essentially that police-log type entry. It was Arizona in 1970 after all- long hairs need not apply. There was probably some press out there obviously- regarding the before and after of this performance -but 'The Arizona Republic' was the only thing I could find on microfiche @ the library that went all the way back to that time.

This post was modified by Reade on 2013-07-17 15:24:59

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Jul 17, 2013 3:05pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express footage & some dating notes

Yeah, there probably wouldn't have been any other mention of the Dead save maybe a little ad announcing them. Just another rock show! But kids causing disturbances in the street, that's news...
I've noticed often in articles of the time, the reporters are much more interested in the troublesome behavior of the concertgoers than the band - you'll get a detailed rundown on the arrests, the drugs, the nuisance to the police, etc, while the Dead are only mentioned as an afterthought, or because they have a strange name...

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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: Jul 17, 2013 5:37pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express footage & some dating notes

" How could peoples' heads have been so far up their rears on this issue at this time? Was the Dead's Phoenix hotel free that night? Did they not need to pay for their meals that day, or the day after? Was it against some laws of hippiedom that musicians couldn't make a living along with everybody else? How could people be so idiotic in their thoughts and actions on this issue?
A great example of 60s idealism jumping the track..... "

Seems pretty alive and well to me as exhibited by the entitlement behavior over not being able to download free soundboards here. Apparently Weir is the antichrist and every body knows exactly what Jerry would do, as if it were a dictatorship in the first place. I think Festival Express was a pretty good example of what Jerry thought - he thought the entitlement attitude was for shit. He probably wouldn't have let himself become involved in the SBD thing at least in public but imo that has more to do with him avoiding confrontation which at many many times was more a character flaw than an attribute.

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Poster: Reade Date: Jul 18, 2013 12:29pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express footage & some dating notes

I agree completely with every point.

The concept of intellectual property has never been a vague or bogus one to me. Who owns the soundboards and has the right to make decisions around them is not a difficult issue to understand in my view.

Precedent is big in our culture (and legal system) however, and whenever something gets 'disallowed,' after being allowed, folks have a natural tendency to scream bloody murder. It's just the way it is, like dogs and mailmen.

I too think Jerry would not have become involved in the SBD thing, in part 'cause of his non-confrontational makeup. But I'd also add that- like everybody -the things he cared about and didn't care about changed over time. And by the time the whole SBD thing happened (2004?) I can't imagine him giving a shit one way or another.

I think I figured something out from this discussion:
When he's on that train in the movie defending the right to charge admission, he is trying to explain the extent to which the money is spread around once it's received. What has become clear to me the more I've thought about this is the 'people on the street' he's referring to are actually all those folks connected to the scene who derive some degree of financial benefit. One might think of it as overhead (sound and lighting people, roadies, truck drivers, on and on) but to Jerry I believe those people weren't so much overhead as *friends.* People he cared about and was happy to see essentially employed. (People gotta eat, and since they were essentially friends to begin with means they were probably a little bent, which in turn means maybe they might not be employed otherwise....)
And to hear people suggest musicians grabbed every penny of ticket revenue and ran screaming to the bank with it really rankled him- due to the fact that the question's premise omitted the reality of the situation and, by definition, people he cared about.

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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: Jul 19, 2013 8:59am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express footage & some dating notes

In addition to that he knew the promoters were doing it out of love and were taking great care of the musicians all the while taking a major bath.

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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: Jul 19, 2013 8:59am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express footage & some dating notes

In addition to that he knew the promoters were doing it out of love and were taking great care of the musicians all the while taking a major bath.

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Jul 14, 2013 10:34am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express footage & some dating notes

Thanks to Monte, I was reminded that Arck posted on this same subject a few years back:
http://archive.org/post/323259/the-mystery-of-the-festival-express-what-do-we-have-from-the-tour

My conclusions differ from his - it seems to me that footage/audio exists from only two Dead shows on the tour. There was a long Rolling Stone article right after the tour that goes into a lot of detail about the shows, on top of other accounts like Cutler's. I'll recheck the video and revise Arck's list of the shows & available material.

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Jul 15, 2013 8:34pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express UPDATES

Another researcher has corrected me on some points - I gave the wrong date for the footage above, misidentifying where it was shot.

Here is a corrected itinerary for the tour, showing what comes from where:

6/27/70 CNE Stadium, Toronto -
Garcia's stage announcement about a free show is in the film.
Nothing from the Dead's stadium show is available.

6/27/70 Coronation Park, Toronto -
A short clip of an acoustic Dead set from this free show is in the film.
The audio is Friend of the Devil - however, it doesn't match the footage, so it could come from anywhere.

The Dead may have played in the park again on 6/28.

6/28/70 CNE Stadium, Toronto -
The Dead apparently did not play the stadium again on this day.

7/1/70 Winnipeg Fairgrounds -
Nighttime show.
Easy Wind (DVD)

The scene with Garcia & Weir arguing with the girl was filmed in Winnipeg before the show.
No More Cane on the Brazos was on the last night of the train ride before reaching Calgary.

7/3/70 McMahon Stadium, Calgary -
There was no show this day, apparently. I don't know why this date was reported for a Dead show.
As far as we know, there were two Calgary shows on 7/4 and 7/5. I believe the Dead just played on 7/4.

7/4/70 McMahon Stadium, Calgary -
An afternoon show.
Acoustic: Don't Ease Me In (film)
Acoustic: Candyman, Dire Wolf, Uncle John's Band (Taper's Section)
NRPS clip (on youtube, no audio)
Electric: Me & My Uncle, China>Rider (Taper's Section)
Electric: New Speedway Boogie (film & Taper's Section)
Electric: Hard to Handle (DVD & partial on Archive "7/1/70")
Electric: Lovelight (Taper's Section & partial clips on youtube)

Garcia & Kreutzmann can also be seen in the nighttime jam with Ian & Sylvia doing CC Rider, probably the same day. (A youtube clip is much longer than shown in the film.)
It may seem bizarre that Ian & Sylvia would go on AFTER the Dead, but after all, this was Canada...

Unknown -
The "7/1/70" clip on the Archive has an electric Candyman which could come from any of the earlier shows. Maybe it's the same show as the Easy Wind.
The end of the film has audio of an acoustic Cold Jordan with NRPS, which could come from anywhere.

EDIT - Updating the updates!
After some more research, it's clear that the Dead only played one show in Toronto, and one in Calgary. For those two-day stretches, the promoters added more bands so that some bands would play on Saturday, some on Sunday.
A newspaper review of the Toronto Festival makes it clear that the Dead only played the stadium on Saturday 6/27. NRPS came on at 9 pm; then the Dead came on & played an hour-long set; then the Band closed out the day. Other performers, including Janis, played the next day. (This makes it more likely that the Dead played in the park again on 6/28.)
A deadlists witness of the Calgary shows says that the Dead played a long set on the first day, and the Band & Janis appeared the next day.

This post was modified by light into ashes on 2013-07-16 03:34:03

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Poster: Arck Date: Jul 16, 2013 8:55am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express UPDATES

Hello there. I'm delighted to see you've opened up this discussion again. I was hoping you'd get involved when I posted originally.

A few responses:

1. How did we miss the 4th/5th July dating, rather than the 3rd? It's shown right here!! http://www.psilo.com/dead/showshow.php?band=1&;date=1970-7-3

2. We can't place Easy Wind (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WwbQN5_8Mys) with certainty as far as I know but...

3. ...it's conceivably from the same location as the all-star jam (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=peDoZBWHLTE) - Garcia appears to be dressed the same anyway.

4. I think the Candyman on the LMA (http://archive.org/details/gd70-07-01.sbd.cotsman.9624.sbeok.shnf) directly proceeds the Easy Wind. Listen to the end of the Easy Wind...you can hear them teasing Candyman. The end of the Archive Easy Wind matches the end of the FE Easy Wind and the Candyman follows completely naturally - same ambience, same tape sound. I'm almost certain the Candyman is from the same show, whatever show that is. The fact it's dated 1 July on the Archive might mean something but then the Hard To Handle is dated 1 July as well and we know it's not.

5. The footage we seem to have from Calgary, which is all clearly from the same location (with the blue stage, with peeling paint):
Don't Ease - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qVWOqFQ6AS0
New Riders - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gUQW3jkHzMI
Hard To Handle - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=axunhqUCXIM
New Speedway - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xNuUfrSDgMw
Lovelight 1 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aJhnOq2q3ag
Lovelight 2 (which begins with the very end of New Speedway) - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXUbDTPBpKI

6. Combining the YouTube footage (that came out of nowhere!) and the Taper's Section audio, we might have most of this show - four acoustic songs followed by six electric songs. Would they have played much more in a festival?

Sorry - most of this is just repeating what you've said. It's late but I'll be back to discuss this.

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Jul 16, 2013 12:39pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express UPDATES

When you originally posted on this tour, I didn't have time to contribute & thought I'd get around to it later... Well, I guess the later finally arrived!

I didn't get into all the reasons for my footage placements here - see these comments for a more thorough look at the research:
http://deadessays.blogspot.com/2009/11/deadnet-tapers-section-index.html?showComment=1373770669305#c5357947430696532556

I suspect there isn't much more footage (& possibly no audio) from the free Coronation Park show(s). The Dead probably played there two days in a row, as deadlists says; there's no contemporary proof, but what else would they have done on 6/28? The first park show on 6/27 went from 7 pm to 4 am; the newspaper account for 6/28 is more vague, but it's clear there was a park show that evening as well.
The thing is, the film crew would not have been prepared to film two separate concert locations at once (let alone setting up the park sound feed as well), so my guess is their filming in the park was brief & limited.

The Easy Wind is definitely from Winnipeg 7/1. You can glimpse the same fairground rides outside that we see during Buddy Guy's Winnipeg set in the film.

I think you're right, Easy Wind to Candyman is continuous!
What intrigues me is that this audio clip is said to be taken from VHS footage, yet I'm not aware of any video circulating for the Candyman.

The all-star jam, I think is the evening of 7/4. Kreutzmann seems to be wearing the same flower shirt, and I think Garcia's put on his denim shirt over the purple T. Also, the Rolling Stone article on the tour confirms that this jam was in Calgary.

All the other Dead footage besides Easy Wind is definitely Calgary 7/4. (As I learned when studying the footage, ignore the stage backdrop - they used the same one in every show, which threw me at first - just go by their clothes & the shots of the stadium.)
The editing in the film is quite tricky & creative - for instance the Calgary Don't Ease Me In is edited with Toronto crowd footage; and you can also see that the DVD Hard to Handle includes footage that we now know is actually from the Lovelight! (This is likely to cover for lack of extra camera angles.)

I'm not sure the show was much longer. At Toronto 6/27, the Dead's set was an hour (plus the NRPS set); with about the same number of bands appearing at Calgary, they should've had roughly the same time slot.
And yet, they could've played longer, too. A deadlists witness claims that the Dead-NRPS show was about 4 hours, which I'm sure is a considerable exaggeration.
Also, the Dead played an acoustic set before NRPS, which they did not do in Toronto 6/27. (Or, technically, they seem to have played acoustic in the park, and then electric at the stadium.) Playing the additional acoustic set suggests that they had some more time - as well as playing the half-hour Lovelight!

If asked, Lemieux might give us the full setlist on his tapes, which would help.

This post was modified by light into ashes on 2013-07-16 19:39:45

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Poster: Arck Date: Jul 17, 2013 8:43am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express UPDATES

Good detective work. I read the comments in the thread you linked. Good detective work by the posters there as well.

So Easy Wind is Winnipeg. That means Easy Wind and Candyman are from Winnipeg. That's all we've got from that show. Somewhere out there is the film of them doing Candyman that night. Maybe it will show up on YouTube one day. There's surely more of that show in the can...

You're spot on about the FOTD in the park - it's not synched up. In retrospect, it makes complete sense if there's no soundboard audio from the park. The shots aren't long enough for me to figure out what they're playing. Any suggestions?

I suppose one thing it does suggest is that they might have played FOTD in Calgary in the acoustic set. We could have guessed that anyway but it seems there's a recording of it from somewhere on the tour.

I find it hard to believe that, even if there are badly labelled reels or copies in the Dead vault, David L wouldn't have researched this a bit. Maybe one of us should email him. It's been a couple of months since I sent him something and last time I did, he replied almost immediately...twice!

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Jul 17, 2013 11:28am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express UPDATES

I'm sure there's more of Winnipeg, and hopefully it'll surface someday!

No suggestions about what they're playing in the park shots, all you can see are a few strums...

My guess is FOTD & Cold Jordan come from the Calgary show, that being the only known recorded acoustic set. And yet...Cold Jordan was always a set-closer, and we have the end of that acoustic set. I wouldn't put it past the producers to have just grabbed the audio from an already circulating show!

The Historic Films site has 132 Festival Express reels on their site; the catch is that the only ones you can watch online are the few non-music reels; any clips with performances you have to pay to watch...
http://www.historicfilms.com/search/?q=collection%3AFE#p1
But, if you click on the pictures at least it'll tell you what's in each reel, in great detail... The truly ardent researcher would go through all this!

By the way, Lemieux mentioned in a 2005 interview:
"I think six songs by the Dead were filmed. Two were in the movie [Don't Ease Me In & New Speedway]. Two were in the bonus disc [Hard to Handle & Easy Wind], and there were two that didn't make the cut. I did recently hear the audio tapes from Winnipeg and Calgary and they were pretty good. It's basically two full shows, maybe an hour & a quarter each... I know there was a good China>Rider and a good Lovelight [probably the ones he's put on the Taper's Section]. Typical 1970 material: some sloppy stuff, some out of tune stuff, but also some incredibly interesting Pigpen stuff. There's a good Attics of My Life, too."
http://www.jambands.com/features/2005/07/09/truckin-up-to-buffalo-part-one-of-an-interview-with-grateful-dead-archivist-david-lemieux

This post was modified by light into ashes on 2013-07-17 18:28:48

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Poster: Arck Date: Jul 17, 2013 5:59pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express UPDATES

Cold Jordan could have been the encore. It also could have been the encore in Winnipeg. All someone needs to so is listen to every SBD Cold Jordan and FOTD from 1970 and see if the versions in the film match any of them. Easy...

David L says two other filmed songs didn't make the cut - Lovelight and Candyman perhaps?

So they have the two full shows...seems odd that he'd then be confusing the two dates when posting the tracks to the Tapers' Section. It doesn't sound like either show will ever be released in its entirety. As you and others have suggested, it wouldn't surprise me if the shows are mainly very unremarkable.

We're they playing Attics acoustic by June/July or was it still only electric? I can't recall. I guess we can add it to the incomplete setlist.

With all due respect to David L - he has always been very gracious and informative when replying to my emails - he can be very selective when he discusses things. He comes across as a bit goofy but I think he's very deliberate when he reveals (or doesn't reveal) something we didn't know.

This post was modified by Arck on 2013-07-18 00:59:48

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Jul 17, 2013 8:55pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express UPDATES

Lemieux might not have seen all the footage of the Dead... Maybe he was just shown six complete Dead songs that had been synced & edited together, and others may be incomplete or not have sound. (There might not exist a complete film clip of that youtube Lovelight, for instance.)

But it does strike me as curious that we have neither sound nor video for even a second of the Dead's Toronto show; nor apparently is it in the Vault. Lost, perhaps?

Attics was mostly electric at that point. There is an acoustic version at the 6/24/70 early show - but that was in the special confines of the Capitol Theater, and I wouldn't expect the Dead to try it acoustic in a festival stadium setting.

I wouldn't rush to call an unheard show unremarkable! Granted, there were probably no adventurous setlists or big jams, but we seem to have most of the Calgary show and it's pretty good, maybe average for the time.
Maybe Toronto was shaky, due to the tense environment & interruptions, but a newspaper report said the Dead "gave a great foot-stomping, pounding, hour-long set, the audience with them all the way, dancing and singing." We have a couple reports saying that all the bands played better as the tour progressed.

Feel free to email Lemieux! I did not have luck emailing him on previous topics, so I don't have much hope of getting setlists out of him... He is indeed selective in what he reveals.

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Poster: ghostofpig Date: Jul 14, 2013 5:34am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express footage & some dating notes

I think those tapes are not in the Vault, no? They were filmed/recorded by an independent company much like Sunshine Daydream.

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Jul 14, 2013 11:11am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express footage & some dating notes

The Toronto show is in the Vault at least, but clearly not from the Dead's own taping crew. I think it is unlabeled reels from the film recorders, which is why Lemieux is so sketchy about the dates. There could possibly be a stray reel or two from the other shows, like 7/1/70; but unless Lemieux shares more we'll never know.

Ironically, a lot more of Janis' shows from this tour exist than the Dead's.

This post was modified by light into ashes on 2013-07-14 18:11:32

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Poster: stratocaster Date: Jul 14, 2013 7:05am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express footage & some dating notes

Apparently Lemiieux is planning to release this stuff, right after he's done with the February 77 box set, the March 77 box set, the April 77 box set, the September 77 box set, the October 77 box set, the November 77 box set and the December 77 box set...

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Poster: Administrator, Curator, or StaffMonte B Cowboy Date: Jul 14, 2013 8:43am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express footage & some dating notes

Several years ago I wrote an essay about Toronto's scene in the late '60s and early '70s. It describes the hippie scene I experienced at the Rochdale College commune in downtown Toronto. Did the Festival Express, or the band, visit Rochdale?

http://archive.org/post/323295/the-mystery-of-the-festival-express-what-about-rochdale-college

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Jul 15, 2013 2:03am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express footage & some dating notes

On the contrary - Rochdale visited the band. The 9/3/70 Rolling Stone article goes into some detail about Rochdale, since the group that organized the free-show protests was based at Rochdale College. The May 4th Movement issued a public statement insisting that the Festival be free.

This post was modified by light into ashes on 2013-07-15 09:03:31

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Poster: Administrator, Curator, or StaffMonte B Cowboy Date: Jul 15, 2013 9:26am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express footage & some dating notes

I watched the clip with Garcia and Weir arguing vehemently with one of the kids who wanted the Festival Express shows to be free. I would point out that the GD band needs to be paid the compensation that was agreed upon for each commercial gig. In doing so, they can manage their resources effectively, and then go on to play numerous "free benefit" shows.

According to WikiPedia, "The tour ultimately began in Toronto at the CNE Grandstand, which was plagued with about 2500 protestors who objected to what they viewed as exploitation by price-gouging promoters. The opposition was organized by the May 4th Movement (M4M), the left-rebel group that grew out of the May 4, 1970 Kent State shootings. They attempted to crash the gates and scale the barbed wire fence and clashed with police, resulting in several injuries. To help calm the crowd, Metro Police Inspector Walter Magahay tried to get the promoter, Ken Walker, to lower ticket prices, but he refused. Subsequently, Jerry Garcia, in conjunction with Magahay, was instrumental in calming the unruly crowd by arranging a spontaneous free "rehearsal" concert in nearby Coronation Park upon a flatbed truck, while the scheduled show continued at the stadium. Once the free concert, which began at about 7:00pm on June 27, was announced, most of the ticketless fans dispersed to Coronation Park, with an initial attendance of about 6,000, thereby resolving the protest."

All the anti-war kids in the USA who were getting drafted knew they could always go to Canada to avoid being sent to Vietnam. Many hundreds (perhaps thousands) of them did go to Canada to avoid the draft. The Canadians were being very, very generous to USA's young men who were seeking asylum in their country. I couldn't access the Rolling Stone article and I wondered if they discussed this point when Jerry and Bobby and those Canadian kids debated "free music".

The May 4 Movement grew out of the Kent State Shootings. GD played a free benefit show at M.I.T. on May 6, 1970 in response to the Kent State massacre.

http://archive.org/post/374829/tdih-an-unscheduled-freebie

The Wesleyan University blog you wrote is a must-read for anyone trying to understand the protests during The Festival Express.

http://deadessays.blogspot.com/2013/02/may-3-1970-wesleyan-university.html

This post was modified by Monte B Cowboy on 2013-07-15 16:26:11

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Jul 15, 2013 12:41pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express footage & some dating notes

From the article:

"M4M (May 4th Movement) is a coalition group of students and street people formed to commemorate the Kent State murders, which inaugurated a confrontation with Toronto Police at the American Consulate on the issue, with 91 persons arrested. They've begun organizing and highlighting various exploitation issues: unemployment, authoritarian schools, police repression, American imperialism, English-Canadian business oppression, $20 bellbottoms, and cultural exploitation...
They spotted [the Festival Express promoters] from the windows of Rochdale College, where M4M is headquartered, and...swooped down, their message picked up and promulgated by the (not notoriously revolutionary) Toronto press: STOP THE RIP-OFF EXPRESS!
Rochdale College (often pronounced Roachdale by bewildered foreigners), ironically facing Marshall McLuhan's offices, is an '18-story high-rise freak palace.' Originally granted government money for the support of a residential experimental college, it has turned into what might be called a front for subsidized housing (though the rents aren't that cheap).
People live and work in this housing-project type building with an incredibly high lifestyle. You see those dope police wearing white institutional jackets? You think they're there to bust you? Forget it. They test the quality of the grass, hash and acid when a complaint about the drug's efficacy is brought up. Hard drug pushers are kindly requested to move on. The fire alarm system is actually used for bust warnings. Local rock groups like the People's Revolutionary Concert Band and Boogie Dick hang out and play for free. There's naked sunbathing on the roof, underground films in the film room; and the College supports the Coach House Press which publishes poetry books and magazines of extraordinary quality. Graffiti decorates all the halls ("Gee, Tonto, I don't think we're in Kansas anymore") and the College paper runs community news and requests: "I want to paint a 17-story marijuana leaf in such a way that it would be visible only from the second floor patio. Come rap with me."
M4M has offices on the third floor. The representatives we'd met were frustrated by the lack of political consciousness among residents of the College. But the group's attack against Festival Express brought them enormous publicity, and they aim for a wider following than Rochdale College inhabitants. An 'Open Letter to a Closed Corporation' presented to [the promoters] on June 19th contained the following:
'We demand that Transcontinental (Rip-Off) Express be free for everyone and all tickets refunded; there be free food, dope and music for the people there, with no cops. Failing these totally reasonable and just demands, we demand that 20 per cent of the gate receipts be returned to the community in the following ways: money for already existing free food programs, day care centers...collective bail fund to fight Toronto pig repression...equipment for all People's Parks,' etc, etc."

(An account follows of M4M's meeting with the promoters, much the same way as it's presented in the film.)

"On the first day of the Toronto Festival, about 2500 kids had tried to break into CNE Stadium, fighting with the cops. Ten police were injured, a number of kids, and 22 were arrested...
Jerry Garcia had helped cool things down by setting up a Free Festival at nearby Coronation Park, where the Dead, Purple Sage, Ian and Sylvia, James and the Goodbrothers, and People's Revolutionary Concert Band played to 4000 kids the first day and 500 the next day... Kids went in and paid to see the second day's show [at the stadium, and a promoter] paid for the supply of free food that was given out at Coronation Park.
About 37,000 persons had attended that two-day Toronto Festival, about 13,000 fewer than expected. The Toronto press played up the violence: 'Bashed Heads and Bad Trips'... The atmosphere was extremely tense, with police using force against kids using their force to break into the Stadium. It had affected the stage presentation, which was sometimes slow.
And it had affected some of the music...as on the first day, when kids clambered on stage trying to politicize the event and were yanked off.... When the Dead played, a kid came onstage and pointed to each member of the Dead and shouted, 'You're all phonies, you and you and you...'"

(There was a press conference on the train when the Express reached Winnipeg.)

"Outside in the lounge a young girl was telling the Dead and Kenny Gradney that there are people starving in Saskatchewan. She was arrogant and sensitive, and even though her words were almost as cliched as the press...her tone was convincing, pleading, intuitive; she spoke with passion.
Jerry Garcia objected to her using the word 'pigs.' "If you call people pigs, that's what they will become. We're not trying to alienate people, we're more interested in getting the whole thing together."
She became angry at not getting through and she stepped up the rhetoric. Kenny told her she didn't know how well off she was. "The radicals in the States have some point. Alberta itself is as far left as anywhere in North America outside of Cuba, so what are you complaining about? This ain't no East LA. Have you ever been taken into a gas station washroom by a couple of cops?"
She backed down and started hitting the price of admissions. To her amazement the Dead sided with the promoters! "If you want something for nothing, jerk off," said Bob Weir, and everybody got up and left.
She was left standing there in the vacuum of her utopian philosophy: simplistic politics, fired by incredible energy and sincerity. While the claims of the M4M are relatively naive and unthought-out, their energy and sincerity is quite convincing...
In Winnipeg, where the promoters would have needed an attendance of at least 21,000 to break even, fewer than 4,000 people showed up at the Manisphere Stadium for the 12-hour concert on Wednesday."

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Poster: Administrator, Curator, or StaffMonte B Cowboy Date: Jul 15, 2013 4:33pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express footage & some dating notes

Wow, that answers my question about GD, The Festival Express and Rochdale. I appreciate you forumites putting together this stuff and the Wesleyan stuff.

re: The Rolling Stone article description of Rochdale - it's very good.

> "18-story high-rise freak palace"

Says it all, there ya go -- People like myself (visiting) there would go inside intending to be there "for a couple of hours". But, you would quickly wind up meeting other people, and going into many other rooms there. There were many scenes going on there, constantly. They had a food store, movie theater, lots of supplies, and most stuff you needed to exist peacefully for days and weeks at a time. Lots of incredible dope was the main thing for me. So, we would come out two, three, four days later wondering what the heck just happened to the "extra days" that disappeared somehow. This happened to me many times I went inside Rochdale. For example, the next closest thing to this experience was free-basing coke for 72 hours - which I also did a few times back then, but not at Rochdale.

> "Originally granted government money for the support of a residential experimental college, it has turned into what might be called a front for subsidized housing (though the rents aren't that cheap)"

Yep, exactly. I remember the Rochdale occupants referring to it as a commune 'takeover'.

> "The fire alarm system is actually used for bust warnings."

Correct. Rochdale had their own security. The first and 2nd floors were "public" areas - things such the movie theater, a food store and stuff like this were on these two floors - no dope. Security was located on the second floor. You had to get past security to actually "go inside Rochdale" and enter the dope scene. To pass through security, you were required to give them a name and room number for someone inside. That's it! Whenever the cops showed up at Rochdale for a bust, security would turn on the fire alarm to warn everyone. Dope dealers, beer dealers (like my draft-dodger friend) and everyone locked up their store fronts and their store rooms and went to their residence rooms to wait it out. The cops usually showed up with a warrant to a search a specific room.

The view of Rochdale's front door from the outside showed a steady flow of people constantly going in and out with back packs, shopping bags, brief cases, packages, and stuff like this. The cops never bothered anyone going in or out when I went there. The very first time there we parked my car (with NJ license plates) inside the Rochdale underground garage. When we drove it back outside, the cops pulled us over before we got one block. We were "clean". After that, we rented a garage outside of town and we took the subway to-and-from Rochdale. We were very impressed with how clean and quiet their subways were compared to NYC's rundown and noisy subway system. Also noteworthy was how very clean and rubbish-free the streets of Toronto were downtown.

> "Graffiti decorates all the halls"

Yep. And there was a concert band shell (overhead thingy) there with a stage, located outside. Too bad they pissed off GD. It would have been an elegant venue for an acoustic set.

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Poster: Skobud Date: Jul 14, 2013 9:49am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express footage & some dating notes

Mickey's kit looks gigantic and Pig looks fantastic. Two great pieces of footage right there. Thanks for that.

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Poster: leftwinger57 Date: Jul 16, 2013 2:51pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express footage & some dating notes

My recollection of the movie ,seeing it years ago that it was way more about the train it's self than being a true concert movie. You did have that bad start and riot and Jerry appeasing the beats w/ a free park gig.I also took away from the the show how chummie Rick Danko and Jerry were and Rick was very drunk.The train liquor car ran out mid trip and they had to stop make a collection from all the artits and raid a store in a one train stop town.Robbie Robertston of course hated it ,too much time between shows and clowning around.Far from the best concert movie but interesting.

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Poster: N Hoey Date: Jul 16, 2013 9:40pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express footage & some dating notes

I attended to SF Film Festival screening of the movie at the Castro Theater in SF in 06 (I think).

Folks associated with producing it spoke before it was shown. Producer? Director? Both? I can't remember now BUT, what I do remember is that is was a tremendous challenge to assemble a coherent film from the available film and sound. That was mainly due to the fact that it was a crazy time, a miracle that the tour happened at all, that it was a nonstop party which DID also involve the film/sound crew. MOST of the footage is technically too flawed to use. Shaky, blurry, out of focus with gaps that mean whole usable songs are few. It may seem had to believe because we are so spoiled by modern production standards but remember shooting 16mm film back then required very serious attention to get quality footage. They had no way to see dailies, they just shot away and hoped for the best and it turned out that there was a lot of crappy useless footage.

I figured that audio might be a different story but while they may have gotten far more technically sound audio, it appears the tapes were handled badly. 5 or 6 festival gigs would generate quite a few reels and apparently they were't carefully labeled and kept fully organized. Also all the off stage filming generated numerous reels of sound to be kept track of too.

Basically the whole thing was just too wild and chaotic for the documentary aspect of it to be done professionally well enough to provide a wealth of usable raw material. They had to scour all that they had to scrape together 2 solid hours of quality material that could stand as a documentary.

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Poster: Dudley Dead Date: Jul 13, 2013 10:24pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express footage & some dating notes

That Lovelight clip (second one) is amazing ! Really underlines how exciting this song must have been to have to seen live .
For Weir to treat the injured cop as a human being, when it would be easy to go with the flow , and just dismiss them a pigs ,is an example of his humanity .
Great clips .
And good job trying to untangle these fragments .
I wonder what from this tour (not just the Dead's performances) is still intact somewhere ?

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Poster: Reade Date: Jul 14, 2013 5:01pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: new Festival Express footage & some dating notes

Weir was following Jerry's lead on the whole cops thing. Jerry- ever the contrarian- was very outspoken around this time about the thing of calling cops 'pigs.'
He liked to say 'if you call them pigs that's what they will become.'